A bio-fluorometric acetone gas imaging system for the dynamic analysis of lipid metabolism in human breath

Takahiro Arakawa, Naoki Mizukoshi, Kenta Iitani, Koji Toma, Kohji Mitsubayashi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We constructed an imaging system to measure the concentration of acetone gas by acetone reduction using secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (S-ADH). Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) was used as an electron donor, and acetone was imaged by fluorescence detection of the decrease in the autofluorescence of NADH. In this system, S-ADH–immobilized membranes wetted with buffer solution containing NADH were placed in a dark box, and UV-LED excitation sheets and a high-sensitivity camera were installed on both sides of the optical axis to enable loading of acetone gas. A hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (H-PTFE) membrane with low autofluorescence was used as a substrate, and honeycomb-like through-hole structures were fabricated using a CO2 laser device. After loading the enzyme membrane with acetone gas standards, a decrease in fluorescence intensity was observed in accordance with the concentration of acetone gas. The degree of decrease in fluorescence intensity was calculated using image analysis software; it was possible to quantify acetone gas at concentrations of 50–2000 ppb, a range that includes the exhaled breath concentration of acetone in healthy subjects. We applied this imaging system to measure the acetone gas in the air exhaled by a healthy individual during fasting.

Original languageEnglish
Article number258
JournalChemosensors
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021 Sep
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acetone
  • Enzyme
  • Gas
  • Imaging system
  • Lipid metabolism
  • Secondary alcohol dehydrogenase
  • UV-LED

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

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