A study on improvement level of speech quality with covering bone conduction microphone for MRI examination

Michi Inagaki, Kenji Muto, Kojiro Takahashi, Kazuo Yagi

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

To overcome the loudness of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner in operation, which can be 100 dB or more, the patient undergoing a scan is typically given an emergency buzzer to use in case of distress. Instead, we propose using a piezoelectric bone-conduction microphone. However, the MRI noise induces vibrations in the patient's body that degrade the speech quality. Our aim is to analyze the speech quality when using a bone-conduction microphone by estimating the effectiveness of shielding the microphone to make the patient's voice clearer against the noise. First, we calculate the level of improvement using a vibration propagation model and the approach of distributed constant on electronic circuit theory, and we design an experiment involving a human phantom made of ceramic and silicone. Next, we measure the vibration acceleration levels of a bone-conducted voice and MRI acoustic noise, and we calculate the level of improvement using the signal-to-noise ratio both with and without shielding the bone-conduction microphone. Here, the signal is the vibration acceleration level of the bone-conducted voice and the noise is the vibration acceleration level of the MRI acoustic noise. The SNR is -13 dB without shielding and -7 dB with 5600 mm2 of shielding, which corresponds to an improvement in speech quality of 6 dB. This result shows that whoever is operating the MRI could hear a patient with a relatively quiet voice against 100 dB of MRI noise.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jan 1
Event46th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Taming Noise and Moving Quiet, INTER-NOISE 2017 - Hong Kong, China
Duration: 2017 Aug 272017 Aug 30

Other

Other46th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Taming Noise and Moving Quiet, INTER-NOISE 2017
CountryChina
CityHong Kong
Period17/8/2717/8/30

Fingerprint

microphones
bones
magnetic resonance
coverings
examination
conduction
shielding
vibration
acoustic imaging
loudness
experiment design
emergencies
silicones
scanners
signal to noise ratios
estimating
ceramics
propagation
electronics

Keywords

  • Bone-conduction microphone
  • MRI noise
  • Speech quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Inagaki, M., Muto, K., Takahashi, K., & Yagi, K. (2017). A study on improvement level of speech quality with covering bone conduction microphone for MRI examination. Paper presented at 46th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Taming Noise and Moving Quiet, INTER-NOISE 2017, Hong Kong, China.

A study on improvement level of speech quality with covering bone conduction microphone for MRI examination. / Inagaki, Michi; Muto, Kenji; Takahashi, Kojiro; Yagi, Kazuo.

2017. Paper presented at 46th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Taming Noise and Moving Quiet, INTER-NOISE 2017, Hong Kong, China.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Inagaki, M, Muto, K, Takahashi, K & Yagi, K 2017, 'A study on improvement level of speech quality with covering bone conduction microphone for MRI examination' Paper presented at 46th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Taming Noise and Moving Quiet, INTER-NOISE 2017, Hong Kong, China, 17/8/27 - 17/8/30, .
Inagaki M, Muto K, Takahashi K, Yagi K. A study on improvement level of speech quality with covering bone conduction microphone for MRI examination. 2017. Paper presented at 46th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Taming Noise and Moving Quiet, INTER-NOISE 2017, Hong Kong, China.
Inagaki, Michi ; Muto, Kenji ; Takahashi, Kojiro ; Yagi, Kazuo. / A study on improvement level of speech quality with covering bone conduction microphone for MRI examination. Paper presented at 46th International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering: Taming Noise and Moving Quiet, INTER-NOISE 2017, Hong Kong, China.
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