Air-flow-based single-cell dispensing system

Tomohiro Kawahara, Shigeo Ohashi, Masaya Hagiwara, Yoko Yamanishi, Fumihito Arai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We discuss a design and fabrication approach to increase the success rate of single-cell dispensing. Two pairs of capacitance sensors are placed in a biochip to detect the flow velocity of cells and air pressure is applied to eject cells by synchronizing the timing. A comprehensive design theory, which takes into account the back-pressure caused by the air pressure, the response time of the system, the sensor properties and the delay of the dispensing from the air pressure, is developed in order to minimize the disturbance of the system and maximize the throughput of the ejection system. Then, the system theoretically has a capability to eject 3 cells/s and the maximum flow velocity is 10 mm/s. The novelty of the system is that the biochip is disposable, which is unlike the conventional mechanical inkjet system; because the biochip is low cost and disposable this prevents contamination and means the drive system is reusable. Finally, we succeeded in automatic dispensing of a single polystyrene bead (100 μm) from a biochip to a culture well atmosphere using the developed cell ejection system with a success rate of 50%. Furthermore, we also succeeded in single swine oocyte dispensing by using the developed system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-306
Number of pages16
JournalAdvanced Robotics
Volume26
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biochips
Air
Flow velocity
Sensors
Polystyrenes
Contamination
Capacitance
Throughput
Fabrication
Costs

Keywords

  • air flow
  • capacitance sensor
  • Cell dispensing
  • inkjet mechanism
  • microchip

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Software

Cite this

Kawahara, T., Ohashi, S., Hagiwara, M., Yamanishi, Y., & Arai, F. (2012). Air-flow-based single-cell dispensing system. Advanced Robotics, 26(3-4), 291-306. https://doi.org/10.1163/156855311X614572

Air-flow-based single-cell dispensing system. / Kawahara, Tomohiro; Ohashi, Shigeo; Hagiwara, Masaya; Yamanishi, Yoko; Arai, Fumihito.

In: Advanced Robotics, Vol. 26, No. 3-4, 2012, p. 291-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kawahara, T, Ohashi, S, Hagiwara, M, Yamanishi, Y & Arai, F 2012, 'Air-flow-based single-cell dispensing system', Advanced Robotics, vol. 26, no. 3-4, pp. 291-306. https://doi.org/10.1163/156855311X614572
Kawahara T, Ohashi S, Hagiwara M, Yamanishi Y, Arai F. Air-flow-based single-cell dispensing system. Advanced Robotics. 2012;26(3-4):291-306. https://doi.org/10.1163/156855311X614572
Kawahara, Tomohiro ; Ohashi, Shigeo ; Hagiwara, Masaya ; Yamanishi, Yoko ; Arai, Fumihito. / Air-flow-based single-cell dispensing system. In: Advanced Robotics. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 3-4. pp. 291-306.
@article{c3f07c361e2c4f4991ffd4f57d33fcb5,
title = "Air-flow-based single-cell dispensing system",
abstract = "We discuss a design and fabrication approach to increase the success rate of single-cell dispensing. Two pairs of capacitance sensors are placed in a biochip to detect the flow velocity of cells and air pressure is applied to eject cells by synchronizing the timing. A comprehensive design theory, which takes into account the back-pressure caused by the air pressure, the response time of the system, the sensor properties and the delay of the dispensing from the air pressure, is developed in order to minimize the disturbance of the system and maximize the throughput of the ejection system. Then, the system theoretically has a capability to eject 3 cells/s and the maximum flow velocity is 10 mm/s. The novelty of the system is that the biochip is disposable, which is unlike the conventional mechanical inkjet system; because the biochip is low cost and disposable this prevents contamination and means the drive system is reusable. Finally, we succeeded in automatic dispensing of a single polystyrene bead (100 μm) from a biochip to a culture well atmosphere using the developed cell ejection system with a success rate of 50{\%}. Furthermore, we also succeeded in single swine oocyte dispensing by using the developed system.",
keywords = "air flow, capacitance sensor, Cell dispensing, inkjet mechanism, microchip",
author = "Tomohiro Kawahara and Shigeo Ohashi and Masaya Hagiwara and Yoko Yamanishi and Fumihito Arai",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1163/156855311X614572",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "291--306",
journal = "Advanced Robotics",
issn = "0169-1864",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "3-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Air-flow-based single-cell dispensing system

AU - Kawahara, Tomohiro

AU - Ohashi, Shigeo

AU - Hagiwara, Masaya

AU - Yamanishi, Yoko

AU - Arai, Fumihito

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - We discuss a design and fabrication approach to increase the success rate of single-cell dispensing. Two pairs of capacitance sensors are placed in a biochip to detect the flow velocity of cells and air pressure is applied to eject cells by synchronizing the timing. A comprehensive design theory, which takes into account the back-pressure caused by the air pressure, the response time of the system, the sensor properties and the delay of the dispensing from the air pressure, is developed in order to minimize the disturbance of the system and maximize the throughput of the ejection system. Then, the system theoretically has a capability to eject 3 cells/s and the maximum flow velocity is 10 mm/s. The novelty of the system is that the biochip is disposable, which is unlike the conventional mechanical inkjet system; because the biochip is low cost and disposable this prevents contamination and means the drive system is reusable. Finally, we succeeded in automatic dispensing of a single polystyrene bead (100 μm) from a biochip to a culture well atmosphere using the developed cell ejection system with a success rate of 50%. Furthermore, we also succeeded in single swine oocyte dispensing by using the developed system.

AB - We discuss a design and fabrication approach to increase the success rate of single-cell dispensing. Two pairs of capacitance sensors are placed in a biochip to detect the flow velocity of cells and air pressure is applied to eject cells by synchronizing the timing. A comprehensive design theory, which takes into account the back-pressure caused by the air pressure, the response time of the system, the sensor properties and the delay of the dispensing from the air pressure, is developed in order to minimize the disturbance of the system and maximize the throughput of the ejection system. Then, the system theoretically has a capability to eject 3 cells/s and the maximum flow velocity is 10 mm/s. The novelty of the system is that the biochip is disposable, which is unlike the conventional mechanical inkjet system; because the biochip is low cost and disposable this prevents contamination and means the drive system is reusable. Finally, we succeeded in automatic dispensing of a single polystyrene bead (100 μm) from a biochip to a culture well atmosphere using the developed cell ejection system with a success rate of 50%. Furthermore, we also succeeded in single swine oocyte dispensing by using the developed system.

KW - air flow

KW - capacitance sensor

KW - Cell dispensing

KW - inkjet mechanism

KW - microchip

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84857843433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84857843433&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1163/156855311X614572

DO - 10.1163/156855311X614572

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84857843433

VL - 26

SP - 291

EP - 306

JO - Advanced Robotics

JF - Advanced Robotics

SN - 0169-1864

IS - 3-4

ER -