An analysis of users' preference on keyboards through ergonomic comparison among four keyboards.

Ryoji Yoshitake, N. Ise, S. Yamada, K. Tsuchiya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The usability of four kinds of keyboards as regards touch and feel was evaluated by measuring the performance and eliciting the preferences of a total of 24 Japanese participants in a test that consisted of typing English text. It was found that quiet keyboards with an indistinct tactile feedback tend to give higher uncorrected error rates than keyboards with a distinct tactile feedback and clicking sound, while no significant difference in throughput was found among the four keyboards. As regards preference, the test participants were divided into two groups: those who preferred keyboards with a distinct tactile feedback and clicking sound, and those who preferred keyboards with an indistinct tactile feedback and no sound. Analysis revealed that these two groups also showed different sensations and preferences with respect to several aspects of the touch and feel of keyboards. This result suggests that suppliers of computer keyboards should provide two kinds of keyboards, with distinct and indistinct tactile key switches, in order to satisfy as many users as possible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-211
Number of pages7
JournalApplied human science : journal of physiological anthropology
Volume16
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Ergonomics
ergonomics
Feedback
Acoustic waves
Computer keyboards
supplier
Group
Switches
Throughput
performance

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An analysis of users' preference on keyboards through ergonomic comparison among four keyboards. / Yoshitake, Ryoji; Ise, N.; Yamada, S.; Tsuchiya, K.

In: Applied human science : journal of physiological anthropology, Vol. 16, No. 5, 1997, p. 205-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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