Balance process during repeated surface perturbation

Adaptation response of joint stiffness and muscle activation

Aizreena Azaman, Shinichirou Yamamoto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

It is believed that humans are keen to learn and initiate more efficient and less energy consumption strategies, especially when they desire repetitive work or motion. However, in human's balancing process, the ability to adapt a repeated surface movement and its response towards imbalance, due to less sensory input, is still unclear. In this study, adaptation behaviours of joint stiffness pattern and muscle activation were observed during limited sensory inputs. Seven young subjects participated in this study. Two different surface perturbations (tilt up-tilt (TT) down and translation (T)) at four different sensory manipulation conditions (include vision and vestibular system) were introduced to the subject. Then, they were asked to maintain their position as long as possible. The results have shown that amplitude of joint stiffness decreased by almost 1.2 percent at the ankle over 10 cycles. However, there is almost no adaptation at the hip. Even though average the adaptation percentage increased as sensory inputs became better (r2>0.3), no significant difference between sensory conditions was recorded (p>0.05). Meanwhile, different adaptation patterns were observed among five different muscles at both types of perturbation, with adaptation at almost 1 percent on average. The findings have shown that adaptation behaviour is able to describe motor learning functions of the balancing process in humans. It helps to enhance human posture control model and muscle dynamic model especially related to continuous repeated motion or force applied to the system.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIECBES 2014, Conference Proceedings - 2014 IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences: "Miri, Where Engineering in Medicine and Biology and Humanity Meet"
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages291-294
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781479940844
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Feb 23
Event3rd IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, IECBES 2014 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Duration: 2014 Dec 82014 Dec 10

Other

Other3rd IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, IECBES 2014
CountryMalaysia
CityKuala Lumpur
Period14/12/814/12/10

Fingerprint

Muscle
Chemical activation
Stiffness
Dynamic models
Energy utilization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Azaman, A., & Yamamoto, S. (2015). Balance process during repeated surface perturbation: Adaptation response of joint stiffness and muscle activation. In IECBES 2014, Conference Proceedings - 2014 IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences: "Miri, Where Engineering in Medicine and Biology and Humanity Meet" (pp. 291-294). [7047505] Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/IECBES.2014.7047505

Balance process during repeated surface perturbation : Adaptation response of joint stiffness and muscle activation. / Azaman, Aizreena; Yamamoto, Shinichirou.

IECBES 2014, Conference Proceedings - 2014 IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences: "Miri, Where Engineering in Medicine and Biology and Humanity Meet". Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015. p. 291-294 7047505.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Azaman, A & Yamamoto, S 2015, Balance process during repeated surface perturbation: Adaptation response of joint stiffness and muscle activation. in IECBES 2014, Conference Proceedings - 2014 IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences: "Miri, Where Engineering in Medicine and Biology and Humanity Meet"., 7047505, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 291-294, 3rd IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, IECBES 2014, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 14/12/8. https://doi.org/10.1109/IECBES.2014.7047505
Azaman A, Yamamoto S. Balance process during repeated surface perturbation: Adaptation response of joint stiffness and muscle activation. In IECBES 2014, Conference Proceedings - 2014 IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences: "Miri, Where Engineering in Medicine and Biology and Humanity Meet". Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2015. p. 291-294. 7047505 https://doi.org/10.1109/IECBES.2014.7047505
Azaman, Aizreena ; Yamamoto, Shinichirou. / Balance process during repeated surface perturbation : Adaptation response of joint stiffness and muscle activation. IECBES 2014, Conference Proceedings - 2014 IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences: "Miri, Where Engineering in Medicine and Biology and Humanity Meet". Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2015. pp. 291-294
@inproceedings{762ca6606efa469aba44052294dcf75d,
title = "Balance process during repeated surface perturbation: Adaptation response of joint stiffness and muscle activation",
abstract = "It is believed that humans are keen to learn and initiate more efficient and less energy consumption strategies, especially when they desire repetitive work or motion. However, in human's balancing process, the ability to adapt a repeated surface movement and its response towards imbalance, due to less sensory input, is still unclear. In this study, adaptation behaviours of joint stiffness pattern and muscle activation were observed during limited sensory inputs. Seven young subjects participated in this study. Two different surface perturbations (tilt up-tilt (TT) down and translation (T)) at four different sensory manipulation conditions (include vision and vestibular system) were introduced to the subject. Then, they were asked to maintain their position as long as possible. The results have shown that amplitude of joint stiffness decreased by almost 1.2 percent at the ankle over 10 cycles. However, there is almost no adaptation at the hip. Even though average the adaptation percentage increased as sensory inputs became better (r2>0.3), no significant difference between sensory conditions was recorded (p>0.05). Meanwhile, different adaptation patterns were observed among five different muscles at both types of perturbation, with adaptation at almost 1 percent on average. The findings have shown that adaptation behaviour is able to describe motor learning functions of the balancing process in humans. It helps to enhance human posture control model and muscle dynamic model especially related to continuous repeated motion or force applied to the system.",
author = "Aizreena Azaman and Shinichirou Yamamoto",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1109/IECBES.2014.7047505",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781479940844",
pages = "291--294",
booktitle = "IECBES 2014, Conference Proceedings - 2014 IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences: {"}Miri, Where Engineering in Medicine and Biology and Humanity Meet{"}",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Balance process during repeated surface perturbation

T2 - Adaptation response of joint stiffness and muscle activation

AU - Azaman, Aizreena

AU - Yamamoto, Shinichirou

PY - 2015/2/23

Y1 - 2015/2/23

N2 - It is believed that humans are keen to learn and initiate more efficient and less energy consumption strategies, especially when they desire repetitive work or motion. However, in human's balancing process, the ability to adapt a repeated surface movement and its response towards imbalance, due to less sensory input, is still unclear. In this study, adaptation behaviours of joint stiffness pattern and muscle activation were observed during limited sensory inputs. Seven young subjects participated in this study. Two different surface perturbations (tilt up-tilt (TT) down and translation (T)) at four different sensory manipulation conditions (include vision and vestibular system) were introduced to the subject. Then, they were asked to maintain their position as long as possible. The results have shown that amplitude of joint stiffness decreased by almost 1.2 percent at the ankle over 10 cycles. However, there is almost no adaptation at the hip. Even though average the adaptation percentage increased as sensory inputs became better (r2>0.3), no significant difference between sensory conditions was recorded (p>0.05). Meanwhile, different adaptation patterns were observed among five different muscles at both types of perturbation, with adaptation at almost 1 percent on average. The findings have shown that adaptation behaviour is able to describe motor learning functions of the balancing process in humans. It helps to enhance human posture control model and muscle dynamic model especially related to continuous repeated motion or force applied to the system.

AB - It is believed that humans are keen to learn and initiate more efficient and less energy consumption strategies, especially when they desire repetitive work or motion. However, in human's balancing process, the ability to adapt a repeated surface movement and its response towards imbalance, due to less sensory input, is still unclear. In this study, adaptation behaviours of joint stiffness pattern and muscle activation were observed during limited sensory inputs. Seven young subjects participated in this study. Two different surface perturbations (tilt up-tilt (TT) down and translation (T)) at four different sensory manipulation conditions (include vision and vestibular system) were introduced to the subject. Then, they were asked to maintain their position as long as possible. The results have shown that amplitude of joint stiffness decreased by almost 1.2 percent at the ankle over 10 cycles. However, there is almost no adaptation at the hip. Even though average the adaptation percentage increased as sensory inputs became better (r2>0.3), no significant difference between sensory conditions was recorded (p>0.05). Meanwhile, different adaptation patterns were observed among five different muscles at both types of perturbation, with adaptation at almost 1 percent on average. The findings have shown that adaptation behaviour is able to describe motor learning functions of the balancing process in humans. It helps to enhance human posture control model and muscle dynamic model especially related to continuous repeated motion or force applied to the system.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925583060&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925583060&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/IECBES.2014.7047505

DO - 10.1109/IECBES.2014.7047505

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781479940844

SP - 291

EP - 294

BT - IECBES 2014, Conference Proceedings - 2014 IEEE Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Sciences: "Miri, Where Engineering in Medicine and Biology and Humanity Meet"

PB - Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.

ER -