Blood heparin sensor made from a paste electrode of graphite particles grafted with molecularly imprinted polymer

Yasuo Yoshimi, Yuto Yagisawa, Rina Yamaguchi, Maki Seki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A real-time heparin monitor could be used to optimize the dosage of heparin during extracorporeal circulation procedures. This report describes the development of a graphite-paste (GP) electrode with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) grafted onto it. Heparin-imprinted poly (methacryloxyethyltriammonium chloride -co- acrylamide -co- methylenebisacrylamide) was grafted directly onto graphite particles. The grafted particles were thoroughly mixed with oil to fabricate the MIP-GP electrode. Traditional cyclic voltammetry was performed with the electrode in physiological saline or bovine whole blood containing 5 mM ferrocyanide and 0–8 units/mL heparin. The current intensity increased with heparin concentration, due to expansion of the effective surface area resulting from heparin-promoted mobility of the oil in the MIP-GP electrode. No significant difference was found in the sensitivity of the current to unfractionated heparin among the electrodes fabricated because of the electrode homogenization resulting from thorough mixing of the MIP-grafted particles and oil. (A previous MIP-grafted indium tin oxide electrode exhibited lower sensitivity in blood than in saline.) Only 60 s were needed to stabilize the current. The current at the MIP-GP electrode was also sensitive to low-molecular-weight heparin in blood, but insensitive to chondroitin sulfate C (CSC), which is a heparin analog. The non-imprinted polymer (NIP)-grafted electrode was insensitive to heparin. Thus, the MIP-GP electrode, which operated through a new heparin-sensing mechanism, is an excellent candidate for application as a disposable sensor to monitor heparin levels in blood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)455-462
Number of pages8
JournalSensors and Actuators, B: Chemical
Volume259
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Apr 15

Fingerprint

heparins
Graphite
Ointments
blood
Heparin
Polymers
Blood
graphite
Electrodes
electrodes
sensors
Sensors
polymers
Oils
oils
Acrylamide
Chondroitin Sulfates
Low Molecular Weight Heparin
sensitivity
low molecular weights

Keywords

  • Graphite paste electrode
  • Heparin
  • Molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)
  • Voltammetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Instrumentation
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Metals and Alloys
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Blood heparin sensor made from a paste electrode of graphite particles grafted with molecularly imprinted polymer. / Yoshimi, Yasuo; Yagisawa, Yuto; Yamaguchi, Rina; Seki, Maki.

In: Sensors and Actuators, B: Chemical, Vol. 259, 15.04.2018, p. 455-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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