Characterization and resolution of evaporation-mediated osmolality shifts that constrain microfluidic cell culture in poly(dimethylsiloxane) devices

Seok Heo Yun, Lourdes M. Cabrera, Jonathan W. Song, Nobuyuki Futai, Yi Chung Tung, Gary D. Smith, Shuichi Takayama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

141 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evaporation is a critical problem when handling submicroliter volumes of fluids. This paper characterizes this problem as it applies to microfluidic cell culture in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) devices and provides a practical solution. Evaporation-mediated osmolality shifts through PDMS membranes with varying thicknesses (10, 1, 0.2, or 0.1 mm) were measured over 96 h. Even in humidified cell culture incubators, evaporation through PDMS and associated shifts in the osmolality of culture media was significant and prevented mouse embryo and human endothelial cell growth and development. A simple diffusion model, where the measured diffusion coefficient for PDMS matches reported values of ∼10-9 m2/s, accounts for these evaporation and osmolality shifts. To overcome this problem, a PDMS-parylene-PDMS hybrid membrane was developed that greatly suppresses evaporation and osmolality shifts, yet possesses thinness and the flexibility necessary to interface with deformation-based microfluidic actuation systems, maintains the clarity for optical microscopy, and enables the successful development of single-cell mouse embryos into blastocysts under static conditions and culture of human endothelial cells under dynamic recirculation of submicroliter volumes of media. These insights and methods demonstrated specifically for embryo and endothelial cell studies will be generally useful for understanding and overcoming evaporation-associated effects in microfluidic cell cultures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1126-1134
Number of pages9
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume79
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Feb 1
Externally publishedYes

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Cell culture
Microfluidics
Evaporation
Endothelial cells
Membranes
Cell growth
Optical microscopy
Culture Media
baysilon
Fluids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Characterization and resolution of evaporation-mediated osmolality shifts that constrain microfluidic cell culture in poly(dimethylsiloxane) devices. / Yun, Seok Heo; Cabrera, Lourdes M.; Song, Jonathan W.; Futai, Nobuyuki; Tung, Yi Chung; Smith, Gary D.; Takayama, Shuichi.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 79, No. 3, 01.02.2007, p. 1126-1134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yun, Seok Heo ; Cabrera, Lourdes M. ; Song, Jonathan W. ; Futai, Nobuyuki ; Tung, Yi Chung ; Smith, Gary D. ; Takayama, Shuichi. / Characterization and resolution of evaporation-mediated osmolality shifts that constrain microfluidic cell culture in poly(dimethylsiloxane) devices. In: Analytical Chemistry. 2007 ; Vol. 79, No. 3. pp. 1126-1134.
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