Comparison between spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in regional cerebral blood volume, and cerebral and plethysmographic pulsations

Kyoko Yamazaki, Mariko Uchida, Akiko Obata, Takusige Katura, Hiroki Satou, Naoki Tanaka, Atsushi Maki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain plays a crucial role in maintaining systemic functions. Hence, the cerebral circulation is important because the tissue in the brain cannot store energy sources within it and has to constantly obtain them with oxygen from the blood flow. The mean cerebral blood flow is kept constant over a wide range of blood pressure levels by the regulation of the cerebral circulation. However, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and volume (rCBV) exhibit strong low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) such as arterial blood pressure and heart rate, which may reflect the interaction of the cerebral and systemic circulation. To gain an insight into the regulation of the cerebral circulation, we investigated LFOs in the rCBV, cerebral pulsation (CP) and plethysmographic pulsation (PP) particularly on their spectral properties. The rCBV and PP signals were simultaneously measured by optical topography (OT: multi-channel near infra-red spectroscopy) and plethysmography with the subject in a resting, seated state. The CP signals were obtained from the pulsatile component contained in the OT signals. When we compared the spectra of LFOs, we found that the spectral peak for LFOs tended to distinctly appear in the order of rCBV, PP, and CP. This distinctness might reflect the regulation of the cerebral circulation. OT signals are considered to contain a contribution from the skin tissue. We also demonstrate that CP is different from the pulsation observed from the skin tissue.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNoise and Fluctuations - 19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF 2007
Pages687-690
Number of pages4
Volume922
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Dec 1
Externally publishedYes
Event19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF2007 - Tokyo, Japan
Duration: 2007 Sep 92007 Sep 14

Other

Other19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF2007
CountryJapan
CityTokyo
Period07/9/907/9/14

Fingerprint

blood volume
low frequencies
blood flow
oscillations
blood pressure
brain
plethysmography
heart rate
energy sources
topography
infrared spectroscopy
oxygen
interactions

Keywords

  • cerebral blood volume
  • heart rate
  • Low-frequency oscillation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Yamazaki, K., Uchida, M., Obata, A., Katura, T., Satou, H., Tanaka, N., & Maki, A. (2007). Comparison between spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in regional cerebral blood volume, and cerebral and plethysmographic pulsations. In Noise and Fluctuations - 19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF 2007 (Vol. 922, pp. 687-690) https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2759769

Comparison between spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in regional cerebral blood volume, and cerebral and plethysmographic pulsations. / Yamazaki, Kyoko; Uchida, Mariko; Obata, Akiko; Katura, Takusige; Satou, Hiroki; Tanaka, Naoki; Maki, Atsushi.

Noise and Fluctuations - 19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF 2007. Vol. 922 2007. p. 687-690.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Yamazaki, K, Uchida, M, Obata, A, Katura, T, Satou, H, Tanaka, N & Maki, A 2007, Comparison between spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in regional cerebral blood volume, and cerebral and plethysmographic pulsations. in Noise and Fluctuations - 19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF 2007. vol. 922, pp. 687-690, 19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF2007, Tokyo, Japan, 07/9/9. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2759769
Yamazaki K, Uchida M, Obata A, Katura T, Satou H, Tanaka N et al. Comparison between spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in regional cerebral blood volume, and cerebral and plethysmographic pulsations. In Noise and Fluctuations - 19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF 2007. Vol. 922. 2007. p. 687-690 https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2759769
Yamazaki, Kyoko ; Uchida, Mariko ; Obata, Akiko ; Katura, Takusige ; Satou, Hiroki ; Tanaka, Naoki ; Maki, Atsushi. / Comparison between spontaneous low-frequency oscillations in regional cerebral blood volume, and cerebral and plethysmographic pulsations. Noise and Fluctuations - 19th International Conference on Noise and Fluctuations, ICNF 2007. Vol. 922 2007. pp. 687-690
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