Effects of shear stress on wound-healing angiogenesis in the rabbit ear chamber

Shigeru Ichioka, Masahiro Shibata, Keisuke Kosaki, Yuko Sato, Kiyonori Harii, Akira Kamiya

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies indicate that wall shear stress plays a significant role in the physiological adaptation of the vascular system. This study focused on the effect of sustained wall shear stress on wound-healing angiogenesis by exploring the morphologic and hemodynamic changes in developing microvessels in vive through the tissue repair process. Rabbits were treated with the α1 blocker prazosin (50 mg/L in water) orally from Day 0 to Day 23 after implantation of ear chambers to increase peripheral blood flow. The microvasculature in the chamber was recorded from Day 7 to Day 23 by using an intravital videomicroscope. The relative area of the chamber covered by vascularized tissue (%), the rate of ingrowth (mm2/day), the total vascular area (mm2), and the wall shear stress level (dyne/cm2) in venules (diameter in 20-40 μm) were quantified using a computerized image analysis system. The relative area increased significantly in the prazosin-treated animals from Days 7 to 19. The chamber of the treated group was completely covered with vascularized tissue earlier than that of the control group. The final total vascular area was larger by 21% in the treated group. The time course of shear stress in the treated group showed an initial elevation (1.44 times increase vs the control) followed by a gradual decrease toward the control level. These findings suggest that Wound-healing angiogenesis may be partly involved in the adaptive response of microvasculature to shear stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-35
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume72
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997 Sep
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Effects of shear stress on wound-healing angiogenesis in the rabbit ear chamber. / Ichioka, Shigeru; Shibata, Masahiro; Kosaki, Keisuke; Sato, Yuko; Harii, Kiyonori; Kamiya, Akira.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 72, No. 1, 09.1997, p. 29-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ichioka, Shigeru ; Shibata, Masahiro ; Kosaki, Keisuke ; Sato, Yuko ; Harii, Kiyonori ; Kamiya, Akira. / Effects of shear stress on wound-healing angiogenesis in the rabbit ear chamber. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 1997 ; Vol. 72, No. 1. pp. 29-35.
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