Energy Interplay in Materials: Unlocking Next-Generation Synchronous Multisource Energy Conversion with Layered 2D Crystals

Alexander Corletto, Amanda V. Ellis, Nick A. Shepelin, Marco Fronzi, David A. Winkler, Joseph G. Shapter, Peter C. Sherrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Layered 2D crystals have unique properties and rich chemical and electronic diversity, with over 6000 2D crystals known and, in principle, millions of different stacked hybrid 2D crystals accessible. This diversity provides unique combinations of properties that can profoundly affect the future of energy conversion and harvesting devices. Notably, this includes catalysts, photovoltaics, superconductors, solar-fuel generators, and piezoelectric devices that will receive broad commercial uptake in the near future. However, the unique properties of layered 2D crystals are not limited to individual applications and they can achieve exceptional performance in multiple energy conversion applications synchronously. This synchronous multisource energy conversion (SMEC) has yet to be fully realized but offers a real game-changer in how devices will be produced and utilized in the future. This perspective highlights the energy interplay in materials and its impact on energy conversion, how SMEC devices can be realized, particularly through layered 2D crystals, and provides a vision of the future of effective environmental energy harvesting devices with layered 2D crystals.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2203849
JournalAdvanced Materials
Volume34
Issue number36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022 Sep 8
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • 2D materials
  • energy harvesting
  • ferroelectrics
  • photovoltaics
  • thermoelectrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

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