Fingertip touch adjust postural orientation during perturbed stance

Aizreena Azaman, Shinichirou Yamamoto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Additional sensory information; especially from touch, was suggested to improve stability by reducing body sway. However, it is less known about the effect of touch on the body’s joint movement during perturbed standing; which is commonly experienced by public transport users. In this study, subjects were asked to try to maintain their standing position with their fingertips on a rigid surface, while surface perturbation was applied at four different perturbation frequencies (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.6 Hz) and different vision input. Motion of joint (ankle, hip and head) and relative centre of mass (COM) were recorded and analysed. The results show that fingertip pressure was higher without vision. Furthermore, different fingertip moment directions were recorded between with vision and with no vision. This possibly indicates a preferred fingertip position that can provide better sensory information to replace sensory loss; especially vision. The range of motion of joints also decreased with fingertip touch-except for head motion. Furthermore, even though there were no significant differences observed between with touch and without touch, the relative COM displacement was less with touch. Thus, even with a very light touch, subjects were able to reduce body sway even in a perturbed stance. Further investigation is needed to determine the changes in centre of pressure (COP) and significant position of fingertip, which can enhance stability.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIFMBE Proceedings
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages342-345
Number of pages4
Volume51
ISBN (Print)9783319193878
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventWorld Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, 2015 - Toronto, Canada
Duration: 2015 Jun 72015 Jun 12

Other

OtherWorld Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, 2015
CountryCanada
CityToronto
Period15/6/715/6/12

Fingerprint

Direction compound

Keywords

  • COM
  • Joint
  • Perturbed stance
  • Touch
  • Vision

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Fingertip touch adjust postural orientation during perturbed stance. / Azaman, Aizreena; Yamamoto, Shinichirou.

IFMBE Proceedings. Vol. 51 Springer Verlag, 2015. p. 342-345.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Azaman, A & Yamamoto, S 2015, Fingertip touch adjust postural orientation during perturbed stance. in IFMBE Proceedings. vol. 51, Springer Verlag, pp. 342-345, World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, 2015, Toronto, Canada, 15/6/7. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19387-8_82
Azaman, Aizreena ; Yamamoto, Shinichirou. / Fingertip touch adjust postural orientation during perturbed stance. IFMBE Proceedings. Vol. 51 Springer Verlag, 2015. pp. 342-345
@inproceedings{7e6e76989832452aa63981d213281d7f,
title = "Fingertip touch adjust postural orientation during perturbed stance",
abstract = "Additional sensory information; especially from touch, was suggested to improve stability by reducing body sway. However, it is less known about the effect of touch on the body’s joint movement during perturbed standing; which is commonly experienced by public transport users. In this study, subjects were asked to try to maintain their standing position with their fingertips on a rigid surface, while surface perturbation was applied at four different perturbation frequencies (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.6 Hz) and different vision input. Motion of joint (ankle, hip and head) and relative centre of mass (COM) were recorded and analysed. The results show that fingertip pressure was higher without vision. Furthermore, different fingertip moment directions were recorded between with vision and with no vision. This possibly indicates a preferred fingertip position that can provide better sensory information to replace sensory loss; especially vision. The range of motion of joints also decreased with fingertip touch-except for head motion. Furthermore, even though there were no significant differences observed between with touch and without touch, the relative COM displacement was less with touch. Thus, even with a very light touch, subjects were able to reduce body sway even in a perturbed stance. Further investigation is needed to determine the changes in centre of pressure (COP) and significant position of fingertip, which can enhance stability.",
keywords = "COM, Joint, Perturbed stance, Touch, Vision",
author = "Aizreena Azaman and Shinichirou Yamamoto",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-19387-8_82",
language = "English",
isbn = "9783319193878",
volume = "51",
pages = "342--345",
booktitle = "IFMBE Proceedings",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Fingertip touch adjust postural orientation during perturbed stance

AU - Azaman, Aizreena

AU - Yamamoto, Shinichirou

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Additional sensory information; especially from touch, was suggested to improve stability by reducing body sway. However, it is less known about the effect of touch on the body’s joint movement during perturbed standing; which is commonly experienced by public transport users. In this study, subjects were asked to try to maintain their standing position with their fingertips on a rigid surface, while surface perturbation was applied at four different perturbation frequencies (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.6 Hz) and different vision input. Motion of joint (ankle, hip and head) and relative centre of mass (COM) were recorded and analysed. The results show that fingertip pressure was higher without vision. Furthermore, different fingertip moment directions were recorded between with vision and with no vision. This possibly indicates a preferred fingertip position that can provide better sensory information to replace sensory loss; especially vision. The range of motion of joints also decreased with fingertip touch-except for head motion. Furthermore, even though there were no significant differences observed between with touch and without touch, the relative COM displacement was less with touch. Thus, even with a very light touch, subjects were able to reduce body sway even in a perturbed stance. Further investigation is needed to determine the changes in centre of pressure (COP) and significant position of fingertip, which can enhance stability.

AB - Additional sensory information; especially from touch, was suggested to improve stability by reducing body sway. However, it is less known about the effect of touch on the body’s joint movement during perturbed standing; which is commonly experienced by public transport users. In this study, subjects were asked to try to maintain their standing position with their fingertips on a rigid surface, while surface perturbation was applied at four different perturbation frequencies (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.6 Hz) and different vision input. Motion of joint (ankle, hip and head) and relative centre of mass (COM) were recorded and analysed. The results show that fingertip pressure was higher without vision. Furthermore, different fingertip moment directions were recorded between with vision and with no vision. This possibly indicates a preferred fingertip position that can provide better sensory information to replace sensory loss; especially vision. The range of motion of joints also decreased with fingertip touch-except for head motion. Furthermore, even though there were no significant differences observed between with touch and without touch, the relative COM displacement was less with touch. Thus, even with a very light touch, subjects were able to reduce body sway even in a perturbed stance. Further investigation is needed to determine the changes in centre of pressure (COP) and significant position of fingertip, which can enhance stability.

KW - COM

KW - Joint

KW - Perturbed stance

KW - Touch

KW - Vision

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84944313457&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84944313457&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-19387-8_82

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-19387-8_82

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9783319193878

VL - 51

SP - 342

EP - 345

BT - IFMBE Proceedings

PB - Springer Verlag

ER -