Flexural rigidity of a single microtubule

Toru Takasone, Saulius Juodkazis, Yuji Kawagishi, Akira Yamaguchi, Shigeki Matsuo, Hitoshi Sakakibara, Haruto Nakayama, Hiroaki Misawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Microtubules, which are flexible biopolymers, can be used for nanotechnology applications (e.g., nano-actuator) as they have a rigidity similar to that of plexyglass and other plastic materials. The flexural rigidity, or bending stiffness, of nucrotubules was measured using a laser trapping technique and dark-field microscopy. One end of a microtubule rod was chemically bound to a glass microsphere, while the other end was bound to a silica glass substrate. Then, the microsphere was lasertrapped and manipulated to exert three different deformation modes on the microtubule. The values of flexural rigidity for these deformations were between 10-25 and 10-23 Nm2 as measured for the 5-25 μm length microtubules. The origin of the length dependence of the flexural rigidity of microtubules is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3015-3019
Number of pages5
JournalJapanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 1: Regular Papers and Short Notes and Review Papers
Volume41
Issue number5 A
Publication statusPublished - 2002 May
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

rigidity
Rigidity
Microspheres
biopolymers
Biopolymers
silica glass
Fused silica
nanotechnology
Nanotechnology
stiffness
Microscopic examination
rods
Actuators
plastics
actuators
trapping
Stiffness
Plastics
microscopy
Glass

Keywords

  • Flexural rigidity
  • Laser manipulation
  • Laser trapping
  • Laser tweezers
  • Microtubule-associated proteins
  • Radiation force

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Takasone, T., Juodkazis, S., Kawagishi, Y., Yamaguchi, A., Matsuo, S., Sakakibara, H., ... Misawa, H. (2002). Flexural rigidity of a single microtubule. Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 1: Regular Papers and Short Notes and Review Papers, 41(5 A), 3015-3019.

Flexural rigidity of a single microtubule. / Takasone, Toru; Juodkazis, Saulius; Kawagishi, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Akira; Matsuo, Shigeki; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Nakayama, Haruto; Misawa, Hiroaki.

In: Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 1: Regular Papers and Short Notes and Review Papers, Vol. 41, No. 5 A, 05.2002, p. 3015-3019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takasone, T, Juodkazis, S, Kawagishi, Y, Yamaguchi, A, Matsuo, S, Sakakibara, H, Nakayama, H & Misawa, H 2002, 'Flexural rigidity of a single microtubule', Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 1: Regular Papers and Short Notes and Review Papers, vol. 41, no. 5 A, pp. 3015-3019.
Takasone T, Juodkazis S, Kawagishi Y, Yamaguchi A, Matsuo S, Sakakibara H et al. Flexural rigidity of a single microtubule. Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 1: Regular Papers and Short Notes and Review Papers. 2002 May;41(5 A):3015-3019.
Takasone, Toru ; Juodkazis, Saulius ; Kawagishi, Yuji ; Yamaguchi, Akira ; Matsuo, Shigeki ; Sakakibara, Hitoshi ; Nakayama, Haruto ; Misawa, Hiroaki. / Flexural rigidity of a single microtubule. In: Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, Part 1: Regular Papers and Short Notes and Review Papers. 2002 ; Vol. 41, No. 5 A. pp. 3015-3019.
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