Hemispherical breathing mode speaker using a dielectric elastomer actuator

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although indoor acoustic characteristics should ideally be assessed by measuring the reverberation time using a point sound source, a regular polyhedron loudspeaker, which has multiple loudspeakers on a chassis, is typically used. However, such a configuration is not a point sound source if the size of the loudspeaker is large relative to the target sound field. This study investigates a small lightweight loudspeaker using a dielectric elastomer actuator vibrating in the breathing mode (the pulsating mode such as the expansion and contraction of a balloon). Acoustic testing with regard to repeatability, sound pressure, vibration mode profiles, and acoustic radiation patterns indicate that dielectric elastomer loudspeakers may be feasible.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)EL424-EL428
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume138
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Oct 1

Fingerprint

loudspeakers
elastomers
breathing
actuators
acoustics
chassis
reverberation
sound fields
balloons
sound pressure
polyhedrons
sound waves
contraction
vibration mode
Sound
expansion
profiles
configurations
Acoustics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Hemispherical breathing mode speaker using a dielectric elastomer actuator. / Hosoya, Naoki; Baba, Shun; Maeda, Shingo.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 138, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. EL424-EL428.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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