Hydride dissociation and hydrogen evolution from cathodically charged gamma-based titanium aluminides

Akito Takasaki, Yoshio Furuya, Kozo Ojima, Youji Taneda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ti-45Al and Ti-50Al (at. pct.) titanium aluminides, whose microstructures consisted of Ti3Al (α2) and TiAl (γ), were cathodically hydrogen-charged in a 5 pct. H2SO4 solution for charging times up to 14.4 ks (4h), and the dissociation process of a hydride and the hydrogen evolution process during heating were investigated by means of high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurement and thermal analyses (thermal differential analysis and thermal desorption spectroscopy). The hydride formed during cathodic charging dissociated at the temperature of about 700 K, and corresponding to the hydride dissociation, hydrogen gas was evolved at the dissociation temperature. In both alloys, the accelerated hydrogen evolutions were observed at the lower temperatures than that for hydride dissociation. The evolution of hydrogen in the Ti-50Al alloy was extremely accelerated at about 523 K and the Ti-45Al at about 600 K. The difference in the accelerated evolution temperatures was strongly dependent on the microstructures, in which structural imperfections, such as microvoids or internal cracks, could be formed during cathodic charging. The Ti-45Al alloy picked up about 1.5 times of hydrogen than the Ti-50Al alloy, and more than 80 pct. of hydrogen was concentrated at the surface layer up to 20 μm in depth direction from the surface of the sample.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHydrogen Effects in Materials
PublisherMinerals, Metals & Materials Soc (TMS)
Pages799-807
Number of pages9
Publication statusPublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1994 5th International Conference on the Effect of Hydrogen on the Behavior of Materials - Moran, WY, USA
Duration: 1994 Sep 111994 Sep 14

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1994 5th International Conference on the Effect of Hydrogen on the Behavior of Materials
CityMoran, WY, USA
Period94/9/1194/9/14

Fingerprint

Hydrides
Titanium
Hydrogen
Temperature
Thermal desorption spectroscopy
Microstructure
Industrial heating
Differential thermal analysis
Cracks
X ray diffraction
Defects
Gases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Takasaki, A., Furuya, Y., Ojima, K., & Taneda, Y. (1996). Hydride dissociation and hydrogen evolution from cathodically charged gamma-based titanium aluminides. In Hydrogen Effects in Materials (pp. 799-807). Minerals, Metals & Materials Soc (TMS).

Hydride dissociation and hydrogen evolution from cathodically charged gamma-based titanium aluminides. / Takasaki, Akito; Furuya, Yoshio; Ojima, Kozo; Taneda, Youji.

Hydrogen Effects in Materials. Minerals, Metals & Materials Soc (TMS), 1996. p. 799-807.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Takasaki, A, Furuya, Y, Ojima, K & Taneda, Y 1996, Hydride dissociation and hydrogen evolution from cathodically charged gamma-based titanium aluminides. in Hydrogen Effects in Materials. Minerals, Metals & Materials Soc (TMS), pp. 799-807, Proceedings of the 1994 5th International Conference on the Effect of Hydrogen on the Behavior of Materials, Moran, WY, USA, 94/9/11.
Takasaki A, Furuya Y, Ojima K, Taneda Y. Hydride dissociation and hydrogen evolution from cathodically charged gamma-based titanium aluminides. In Hydrogen Effects in Materials. Minerals, Metals & Materials Soc (TMS). 1996. p. 799-807
Takasaki, Akito ; Furuya, Yoshio ; Ojima, Kozo ; Taneda, Youji. / Hydride dissociation and hydrogen evolution from cathodically charged gamma-based titanium aluminides. Hydrogen Effects in Materials. Minerals, Metals & Materials Soc (TMS), 1996. pp. 799-807
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AB - Ti-45Al and Ti-50Al (at. pct.) titanium aluminides, whose microstructures consisted of Ti3Al (α2) and TiAl (γ), were cathodically hydrogen-charged in a 5 pct. H2SO4 solution for charging times up to 14.4 ks (4h), and the dissociation process of a hydride and the hydrogen evolution process during heating were investigated by means of high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurement and thermal analyses (thermal differential analysis and thermal desorption spectroscopy). The hydride formed during cathodic charging dissociated at the temperature of about 700 K, and corresponding to the hydride dissociation, hydrogen gas was evolved at the dissociation temperature. In both alloys, the accelerated hydrogen evolutions were observed at the lower temperatures than that for hydride dissociation. The evolution of hydrogen in the Ti-50Al alloy was extremely accelerated at about 523 K and the Ti-45Al at about 600 K. The difference in the accelerated evolution temperatures was strongly dependent on the microstructures, in which structural imperfections, such as microvoids or internal cracks, could be formed during cathodic charging. The Ti-45Al alloy picked up about 1.5 times of hydrogen than the Ti-50Al alloy, and more than 80 pct. of hydrogen was concentrated at the surface layer up to 20 μm in depth direction from the surface of the sample.

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