Long-term vitamin E-deficient mice exhibit cognitive dysfunction via elevation of brain oxidation

Koji Fukui, Keisuke Nakamura, Masashi Shirai, Anna Hirano, Hirokatsu Takatsu, Shiro Urano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin E inhibits oxidative processes in living tissues. We produced vitamin E-deficient mice by feeding them a vitamin E-deficient diet to verify the influence of chronic vitamin E deficiency on cognitive function. We measured cognitive function over a 5-d period using the Morris water maze task, as well as antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation in discrete brain regions, and total serum cholesterol content. Three- and six-mo-old vitamin E-deficient and age-matched control mice were used. In addition, 24-mo-old mice were used as an aged-model. In the 3-mo-old mice, cognitive function in the vitamin E-deficient (short-term vitamin E-deficient) group was significantly impaired compared to age-matched controls. Although the lipid peroxidation products in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus did not significantly differ in 3-mo-old mice, the levels in the 6-mo-old vitamin E-deficient (long-term vitamin E-deficient) mice were significantly increased compared to age-matched controls. Serum cholesterol content was also significantly increased in the short- and long-term vitamin E-deficient mice compared to their respective age-matched controls. These results indicate that chronic vitamin E deficiency may slowly accelerate brain oxidation. Thus, vitamin E concentrations may need to be monitored in order to prevent the risk of cognitive dysfunction, even under normal conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)362-368
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology
Volume61
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015 Dec 4

Keywords

  • Brain oxidation
  • Cholesterol
  • Cognition
  • Long-term
  • Vitamin E-deficient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Long-term vitamin E-deficient mice exhibit cognitive dysfunction via elevation of brain oxidation. / Fukui, Koji; Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirai, Masashi; Hirano, Anna; Takatsu, Hirokatsu; Urano, Shiro.

In: Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology, Vol. 61, No. 5, 04.12.2015, p. 362-368.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fukui, Koji ; Nakamura, Keisuke ; Shirai, Masashi ; Hirano, Anna ; Takatsu, Hirokatsu ; Urano, Shiro. / Long-term vitamin E-deficient mice exhibit cognitive dysfunction via elevation of brain oxidation. In: Journal of Nutritional Science and Vitaminology. 2015 ; Vol. 61, No. 5. pp. 362-368.
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