Microfabrication by femtosecond laser irradiation

Hiroaki Misawa, Hong Bo Sun, Saulius Juodkazis, Mitsuru Watanabe, Shigeki Matsuo

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Femtosecond (fs) laser microfabrication has been gathering more research interests due to its ability to create micro- and sub-micrometer three-dimensional (3D) structures. An extremely high light intensity (approximately TW/cm 2) enables multiphoton absorption (MPA) in transparent materials, upon which the spatial resolution of fabricated elements is confined to the sizes even smaller than optical diffraction limit. Our report will formulate the principles of the laser microfabrication of such applications. A direct application of single-shot pulse-induced optical damage is a 3D optical memory with a storage density of ca. 100 Gbits/cm 2 in silica. Photonic and optoelectronic applications such as optical gratings, 3D inlayed-`atom'-like and 2D cylinder-consisted photonic crystals have been fabricated in silica. Also, photopolymerization of photoresist by a scanning of focal point of laser irradiation solidifies submicrometer rods, which forms photonic lattices when packed into well-defined 3D pattern. Photonic bandgap effects (at 2-4 μm) of above-mentioned structures were corroborated by infrared Fourier spectroscopy and numerical simulations, by which the success of laser microfabrication was evidenced. Self-focusing of fs-pulses (optical Kerr effect) is another possibility of the microstructuring of transparent materials, which is demonstrated in the case of silica. This could find its application in sub-diffraction-limited recording.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherSociety of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers
Pages246-260
Number of pages15
Volume3933
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes
EventLaser Applications in Microelectronic and Optoelectronic Manufacturing V - San Jose, CA, USA
Duration: 2000 Jan 242000 Jan 26

Other

OtherLaser Applications in Microelectronic and Optoelectronic Manufacturing V
CitySan Jose, CA, USA
Period00/1/2400/1/26

Fingerprint

Microfabrication
Laser beam effects
Ultrashort pulses
photonics
transparence
irradiation
Silica
silicon dioxide
Photonics
lasers
Diffraction
High intensity light
Optical Kerr effect
Optical lattices
Optical data storage
multiphoton absorption
Photopolymerization
Lasers
Diffraction gratings
self focusing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Misawa, H., Sun, H. B., Juodkazis, S., Watanabe, M., & Matsuo, S. (2000). Microfabrication by femtosecond laser irradiation. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 3933, pp. 246-260). Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

Microfabrication by femtosecond laser irradiation. / Misawa, Hiroaki; Sun, Hong Bo; Juodkazis, Saulius; Watanabe, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Shigeki.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3933 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, 2000. p. 246-260.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Misawa, H, Sun, HB, Juodkazis, S, Watanabe, M & Matsuo, S 2000, Microfabrication by femtosecond laser irradiation. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 3933, Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, pp. 246-260, Laser Applications in Microelectronic and Optoelectronic Manufacturing V, San Jose, CA, USA, 00/1/24.
Misawa H, Sun HB, Juodkazis S, Watanabe M, Matsuo S. Microfabrication by femtosecond laser irradiation. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3933. Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers. 2000. p. 246-260
Misawa, Hiroaki ; Sun, Hong Bo ; Juodkazis, Saulius ; Watanabe, Mitsuru ; Matsuo, Shigeki. / Microfabrication by femtosecond laser irradiation. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 3933 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers, 2000. pp. 246-260
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