Non-contact acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation: Generation of a pulse sound source with a small amplitude

Naoki Hosoya, Itsuro Kajiwara, Tatsuo Inoue, Koh Umenai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A method to generate a pulse sound source for acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation with a plasma plume is discussed. Irradiating a solid surface with a laser beam expands a high-temperature plasma plume composed of free electrons, ionized atoms, etc. at a high velocity throughout ambient air. The shockwave generated by the plasma plume becomes the pulse sound source. A laser ablation sound source has two features. Because laser ablation is induced when the laser fluence reaches 1012-1014 W/m2, which is less than that for laser-induced breakdown (1015 W/m2), laser ablation can generate a lower sound pressure, and the sound source has a hemispherical radiation pattern on the surface where laser ablation is generated. Additionally, another feature is that laser-induced breakdown sound sources can fluctuate, whereas laser ablation sound sources do not because laser ablation is produced at a laser beam-irradiation point. We validate this laser ablation method for acoustic tests by comparing the measured and theoretical resonant frequencies of an impedance tube.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4254-4264
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Sound and Vibration
Volume333
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014 Sep 1

Fingerprint

Laser ablation
laser ablation
Laser pulses
Acoustics
Acoustic waves
acoustics
pulses
plumes
Plasmas
Laser beams
Lasers
breakdown
laser beams
lasers
Acoustic impedance
high temperature plasmas
sound pressure
solid surfaces
free electrons
resonant frequencies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Non-contact acoustic tests based on nanosecond laser ablation : Generation of a pulse sound source with a small amplitude. / Hosoya, Naoki; Kajiwara, Itsuro; Inoue, Tatsuo; Umenai, Koh.

In: Journal of Sound and Vibration, Vol. 333, No. 18, 01.09.2014, p. 4254-4264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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