Optical topography for higher-order brain-function imaging and its practical applications

H. Koizumi, Hiroki Satou, Y. Yamamoto, Y. Hirabayashi, M. Kiguchi, T. Yamamoto, A. Maki, H. Kawaguchi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Optical topography is a completely non-invasive technique for obtaining dynamic images of the brain during the processing of higher-order functions, including mentation. Here, “higher-order brain functions” refers to functions of the cerebral cortex, the most recently evolved part of the brain. In addition, “completely non-invasive” indicates techniques that do not harm the body, require the insertion or ingestion of foreign objects or substances, or cause any real discomfort. Near-infrared spectroscopy is used to make the measurements for optical topography. Unlike conventional brainfunction- imaging methods such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), optical topography only requires compact and portable equipment. This makes it relatively easy for anyone to observe brain activity. A further contrast is that optical topography does not require the patient to be fixed to a platform. Researchers have started to investigate the application of optical topography to the observation of brain activity in everyday life, including the viewing of television and video programs, participation in various types of games and entertainment, driving, exercising, dreaming, the experience of psychological trauma, and the gaining of insight into problems. In short, optical topography has opened up new fields of application and these continue to expand.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography
PublisherInternational Society for Industrial Process Tomography
ISBN (Electronic)9780853163206
Publication statusPublished - 2005 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes
Event4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography - Aizu
Duration: 2005 Sep 52005 Sep 5

Other

Other4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography
CityAizu
Period05/9/505/9/5

Fingerprint

Topography
Brain
Imaging techniques
Portable equipment
Positron emission tomography
Near infrared spectroscopy
Television
Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Koizumi, H., Satou, H., Yamamoto, Y., Hirabayashi, Y., Kiguchi, M., Yamamoto, T., ... Kawaguchi, H. (2005). Optical topography for higher-order brain-function imaging and its practical applications. In 4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography International Society for Industrial Process Tomography.

Optical topography for higher-order brain-function imaging and its practical applications. / Koizumi, H.; Satou, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Y.; Hirabayashi, Y.; Kiguchi, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Maki, A.; Kawaguchi, H.

4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography. International Society for Industrial Process Tomography, 2005.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Koizumi, H, Satou, H, Yamamoto, Y, Hirabayashi, Y, Kiguchi, M, Yamamoto, T, Maki, A & Kawaguchi, H 2005, Optical topography for higher-order brain-function imaging and its practical applications. in 4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography. International Society for Industrial Process Tomography, 4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography, Aizu, 05/9/5.
Koizumi H, Satou H, Yamamoto Y, Hirabayashi Y, Kiguchi M, Yamamoto T et al. Optical topography for higher-order brain-function imaging and its practical applications. In 4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography. International Society for Industrial Process Tomography. 2005
Koizumi, H. ; Satou, Hiroki ; Yamamoto, Y. ; Hirabayashi, Y. ; Kiguchi, M. ; Yamamoto, T. ; Maki, A. ; Kawaguchi, H. / Optical topography for higher-order brain-function imaging and its practical applications. 4th World Congress in Industrial Process Tomography. International Society for Industrial Process Tomography, 2005.
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