Oxidative damage of rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and changes in antioxidative defense systems caused by hyperoxia

Koji Onodera, Nao Omi Omoi, Koji Fukui, Takahiro Hayasaka, Tadashi Shinkai, Shozo Suzuki, Kouichi Abe, Shiro Urano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to elucidate the oxidative damage in rat brain caused by oxidative stress, regional changes in the levels of lipid peroxidation products and antioxidative defense systems in cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and in their synapses, which modulate learning and memory functions in the brain, were studied. When rats were subjected to hyperoxia as an oxidative stress, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) in the regions studied increased more than in normal rats by approximately 35%. The values in oxygen-unexposed vitamin E-deficient rats were also higher than in normal rats. It was found that the TBARS contents in synaptosomes isolated from both regions were remarkably higher than in the organs. These results imply that synapses are more susceptible to oxidative stress than the organ itself. This tendency was also observed in the content of conjugated diene. In response to oxidative stress, the status of the antioxidant defense system in each region, i.e. the concentration of vitamin E, and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, decreased remarkably. On the other hand, in oxygen-unexposed vitamin E-deficient rats, the activities of these enzymes in each region tended to increase, except for catalase activity. These results suggest that in response to the oxidative stress, the antioxidant defense systems may be consumed to prevent oxidative damage, and then, may be supplied through the antioxidant network.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)367-372
Number of pages6
JournalFree Radical Research
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003 Apr 1

Fingerprint

Oxidative stress
Rats
Vitamin E
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
Antioxidants
Catalase
Brain
Oxygen
Glutathione Peroxidase
Superoxide Dismutase
Lipids
Data storage equipment
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Cerebral cortex
  • Hippocampus
  • Oxidative damage
  • Synapse
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Oxidative damage of rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and changes in antioxidative defense systems caused by hyperoxia. / Onodera, Koji; Omoi, Nao Omi; Fukui, Koji; Hayasaka, Takahiro; Shinkai, Tadashi; Suzuki, Shozo; Abe, Kouichi; Urano, Shiro.

In: Free Radical Research, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 367-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Onodera, Koji ; Omoi, Nao Omi ; Fukui, Koji ; Hayasaka, Takahiro ; Shinkai, Tadashi ; Suzuki, Shozo ; Abe, Kouichi ; Urano, Shiro. / Oxidative damage of rat cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and changes in antioxidative defense systems caused by hyperoxia. In: Free Radical Research. 2003 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 367-372.
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