Percentage of correct answers of relationship between SNR of voice quality and pressuring force of bone conduction microphone

Michi Inagaki, Kenji Muto

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner operates at a noise level of 100 dB or more. When a patient uses a piezoelectric bone conduction microphone to communicate with the doctor, the MRI vibrations deteriorate the quality of the patient's speech. Our aim was to improve the quality of the patient's speech when communicating with a doctor from within the noisy MRI environment. Shielding of the bone conduction microphone improved the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to −7 dB; however, it was not sufficient to understand the patient's voice accurately. In this paper, the effective SNR required to understand the patient's voice accurately was clarified. First, we measured the relationship between the force applied on the microphone and the percentage of the patient's answers that were correctly understood. Next, we measured the relationship between the SNR, from three types of MRI noise and the percentage of correct answers that were obtained at the optimum applied force. The results showed that the SNR needs to be over 0 dB to achieve accurate communication with the patient when using the most effective force on the microphone.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018, ICSV 2018
Subtitle of host publicationHiroshima Calling
PublisherInternational Institute of Acoustics and Vibration, IIAV
Pages115-121
Number of pages7
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9781510868458
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 1
Event25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018: Hiroshima Calling, ICSV 2018 - Hiroshima, Japan
Duration: 2018 Jul 82018 Jul 12

Other

Other25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018: Hiroshima Calling, ICSV 2018
CountryJapan
CityHiroshima
Period18/7/818/7/12

Fingerprint

microphones
bones
signal to noise ratios
conduction
magnetic resonance
communicating
scanners
shielding
communication
vibration

Keywords

  • Bone conduction microphone
  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  • Percentage of correct answers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Inagaki, M., & Muto, K. (2018). Percentage of correct answers of relationship between SNR of voice quality and pressuring force of bone conduction microphone. In 25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018, ICSV 2018: Hiroshima Calling (Vol. 1, pp. 115-121). International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration, IIAV.

Percentage of correct answers of relationship between SNR of voice quality and pressuring force of bone conduction microphone. / Inagaki, Michi; Muto, Kenji.

25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018, ICSV 2018: Hiroshima Calling. Vol. 1 International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration, IIAV, 2018. p. 115-121.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Inagaki, M & Muto, K 2018, Percentage of correct answers of relationship between SNR of voice quality and pressuring force of bone conduction microphone. in 25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018, ICSV 2018: Hiroshima Calling. vol. 1, International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration, IIAV, pp. 115-121, 25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018: Hiroshima Calling, ICSV 2018, Hiroshima, Japan, 18/7/8.
Inagaki M, Muto K. Percentage of correct answers of relationship between SNR of voice quality and pressuring force of bone conduction microphone. In 25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018, ICSV 2018: Hiroshima Calling. Vol. 1. International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration, IIAV. 2018. p. 115-121
Inagaki, Michi ; Muto, Kenji. / Percentage of correct answers of relationship between SNR of voice quality and pressuring force of bone conduction microphone. 25th International Congress on Sound and Vibration 2018, ICSV 2018: Hiroshima Calling. Vol. 1 International Institute of Acoustics and Vibration, IIAV, 2018. pp. 115-121
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