Radiation induced surface activity phenomenon (1st report: Surface wettability on metal oxides)

Yasuyuki Imai, Tatsuya Koga, Tomoji Takamasa, Koji Okamoto, Susumu Uematsu

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Improving the limit of boiling heat transfer or critical heat flux requires that the cooling liquid can contact the heating surface, or a high-wettability, highly hydrophilic heating surface, even if a vapor bubble layer is generated on the surface. We investigated surface wettability using metal oxides irradiated by gamma rays in room condition. Contact angle, an indicator of macroscopic wettability, was measured by image processing of the images obtained by a CCD video camera. The results showed that the surface wettability on oxide metal pieces of titanium, zircalloy No. 4, SUS-304 and copper improved significantly by Radiation Induced Surface Activity (RISA) phenomenon. Highly hydrophilic conditions on the test pieces were achieved after 500 kGy irradiation of 60Co gamma ray.

Original languageEnglish
Pages979-982
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2002 Jan 1
Event10th International Conference on Nuclear Engineering (ICONE 10) - Arlington, VA, United States
Duration: 2002 Apr 142002 Apr 18

Conference

Conference10th International Conference on Nuclear Engineering (ICONE 10)
CountryUnited States
CityArlington, VA
Period02/4/1402/4/18

Keywords

  • Contact angle
  • Metal oxides
  • Radiation induced surface activity (RISA)
  • Thermal characteristics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering

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  • Cite this

    Imai, Y., Koga, T., Takamasa, T., Okamoto, K., & Uematsu, S. (2002). Radiation induced surface activity phenomenon (1st report: Surface wettability on metal oxides). 979-982. Paper presented at 10th International Conference on Nuclear Engineering (ICONE 10), Arlington, VA, United States.