Self-aided manipulator system for bed-ridden patients - Evaluation of psychological influence for the generated approach motion

Akihiko Hanafusa, Johta Sasaki, Teruhiko Fuwa, Tomozumi Ikeda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rehabilitation robots that are used to assist patients should be able to move naturally and cause no discomfort to the patients. In this study, a self-aided manipulator system that can generate natural motion and assist bed-ridden patients has been developed. The self-aided manipulator is designed so that it can grasp a glass of water from a side table for the patient. The system can detect the starting position (position of the glass) and the target position (position of the patient's lips) by using a video camera. The direction angle of the patient's face is also determined, and approach motions are generated on the basis of these angles. Approach motions are generated by changing the peak velocity time, maximum speed, and detour point position of the manipulator, and the psychological influence on the patient is evaluated on the basis of their heart rate variability (HRV), skin potential response (SPR), and response to questionnaires. The results suggested that a peak velocity time of 75% of the total movement time, a maximum speed of 36 cm/s, and an approach path from the right when the patient's head is facing straight or to the left tended to have the strongest psychological influence on the patient. From these results, it was indicated that the following conditions are preferable for the approach motion of the manipulator: a peak velocity time of approximately 25 to 50% of the total movement time, a maximum speed from 18 to 24 cm/s, and an approach path in the direction in which the head faces.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009
Pages626-631
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009 - Kyoto
Duration: 2009 Jun 232009 Jun 26

Other

Other2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009
CityKyoto
Period09/6/2309/6/26

Fingerprint

Manipulators
Glass
Video cameras
Patient rehabilitation
Skin
Robots
Water

Keywords

  • Approach motion
  • Psychological influence
  • Self-aided manipulator
  • Video camera

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Hanafusa, A., Sasaki, J., Fuwa, T., & Ikeda, T. (2009). Self-aided manipulator system for bed-ridden patients - Evaluation of psychological influence for the generated approach motion. In 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009 (pp. 626-631). [5209511] https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2009.5209511

Self-aided manipulator system for bed-ridden patients - Evaluation of psychological influence for the generated approach motion. / Hanafusa, Akihiko; Sasaki, Johta; Fuwa, Teruhiko; Ikeda, Tomozumi.

2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009. 2009. p. 626-631 5209511.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hanafusa, A, Sasaki, J, Fuwa, T & Ikeda, T 2009, Self-aided manipulator system for bed-ridden patients - Evaluation of psychological influence for the generated approach motion. in 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009., 5209511, pp. 626-631, 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009, Kyoto, 09/6/23. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2009.5209511
Hanafusa A, Sasaki J, Fuwa T, Ikeda T. Self-aided manipulator system for bed-ridden patients - Evaluation of psychological influence for the generated approach motion. In 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009. 2009. p. 626-631. 5209511 https://doi.org/10.1109/ICORR.2009.5209511
Hanafusa, Akihiko ; Sasaki, Johta ; Fuwa, Teruhiko ; Ikeda, Tomozumi. / Self-aided manipulator system for bed-ridden patients - Evaluation of psychological influence for the generated approach motion. 2009 IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, ICORR 2009. 2009. pp. 626-631
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