Synchronous activity of two people's prefrontal cortices during a cooperative task measured by simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy

Tsukasa Funane, Masashi Kiguchi, Hirokazu Atsumori, Hiroki Satou, Kisou Kubota, Hideaki Koizumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain activity during cooperation as a form of social process is studied. We investigate the relationship between coinstantaneous brain-activation signals of multiple participants and their cooperative-task performance. A wearable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system is used for simultaneously measuring the brain activities of two participants. Each pair of participants perform a cooperative task, and their relative changes in cerebral blood are measured with the NIRS system. As for the task, the participants are told to count 10 s in their mind after an auditory cue and press a button. They are also told to adjust the timing of their button presses to make them as synchronized as possible. Certain information, namely, the "intertime interval" between the two button presses of each participant pair and which of the participants was the faster, is fed back to the participants by a beep sound after each trial. When the spatiotemporal covariance between the activation patterns of the prefrontal cortices of each participant is higher, the intertime interval between their button-press times was shorter. This result suggests that the synchronized activation patterns of the two participants' brains are associated with their performance when they interact in a cooperative task.

Original languageEnglish
Article number077011
JournalJournal of Biomedical Optics
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011 Jul 1
Externally publishedYes

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buttons
Near infrared spectroscopy
cortexes
brain
Brain
infrared spectroscopy
Chemical activation
activation
intervals
cues
blood
Blood
time measurement
Acoustic waves
acoustics

Keywords

  • Brain activity
  • Hemoglobin
  • Hyperscanning
  • Near-infrared spectroscopy
  • Simultaneous measurement
  • Wearable optical topography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Synchronous activity of two people's prefrontal cortices during a cooperative task measured by simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy. / Funane, Tsukasa; Kiguchi, Masashi; Atsumori, Hirokazu; Satou, Hiroki; Kubota, Kisou; Koizumi, Hideaki.

In: Journal of Biomedical Optics, Vol. 16, No. 7, 077011, 01.07.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Funane, Tsukasa ; Kiguchi, Masashi ; Atsumori, Hirokazu ; Satou, Hiroki ; Kubota, Kisou ; Koizumi, Hideaki. / Synchronous activity of two people's prefrontal cortices during a cooperative task measured by simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy. In: Journal of Biomedical Optics. 2011 ; Vol. 16, No. 7.
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