Using the light scattering component of optical intrinsic signals to visualize in vivo functional structures of neural tissues

Rajagopalan Umamaheswari, Kazushige Tsunoda, Manabu Tanifuji

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Visualization of changes in reflected light from in vivo brain tissues reveals spatial patterns of neural activity. An important factor which influences the degree of light reflected includes the change in light scattering elicited by neural activation. Microstructures of neural tissues generally cause light scattering, and neural activities are associated with some changes in the microstructures. Here, we show that the optical properties unique to light scattering enable us to visualize spatial patterns of retinal activity non-invasively (FRG: functional retinography), and resolve functional structures in depth (fOCT: functional optical coherence tomography).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDynamic Brain Imaging
Subtitle of host publicationMulti-Modal Methods and In Vivo Applications
PublisherHumana Press
Pages111-132
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9781934115749
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Jan 1
Externally publishedYes

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume489
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Keywords

  • Intrinisic signal imaging
  • Light scattering
  • OCT
  • Optical coherence tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Umamaheswari, R., Tsunoda, K., & Tanifuji, M. (2009). Using the light scattering component of optical intrinsic signals to visualize in vivo functional structures of neural tissues. In Dynamic Brain Imaging: Multi-Modal Methods and In Vivo Applications (pp. 111-132). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 489). Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-543-5_6

Using the light scattering component of optical intrinsic signals to visualize in vivo functional structures of neural tissues. / Umamaheswari, Rajagopalan; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Tanifuji, Manabu.

Dynamic Brain Imaging: Multi-Modal Methods and In Vivo Applications. Humana Press, 2009. p. 111-132 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 489).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Umamaheswari, R, Tsunoda, K & Tanifuji, M 2009, Using the light scattering component of optical intrinsic signals to visualize in vivo functional structures of neural tissues. in Dynamic Brain Imaging: Multi-Modal Methods and In Vivo Applications. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 489, Humana Press, pp. 111-132. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-543-5_6
Umamaheswari R, Tsunoda K, Tanifuji M. Using the light scattering component of optical intrinsic signals to visualize in vivo functional structures of neural tissues. In Dynamic Brain Imaging: Multi-Modal Methods and In Vivo Applications. Humana Press. 2009. p. 111-132. (Methods in Molecular Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-543-5_6
Umamaheswari, Rajagopalan ; Tsunoda, Kazushige ; Tanifuji, Manabu. / Using the light scattering component of optical intrinsic signals to visualize in vivo functional structures of neural tissues. Dynamic Brain Imaging: Multi-Modal Methods and In Vivo Applications. Humana Press, 2009. pp. 111-132 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
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