Utilization of dimethyl sulfide as a sulfur source with the aid of light by Marinobacterium sp. Strain DMS-S1

Hiroyuki Fuse, O. Takimura, K. Murakami, Y. Yamaoka, T. Omori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Strain DMS-S1 isolated from seawater was able to utilize dimethyl sulfide (DMS) as a sulfur source only in the presence of light in a sulfur-lacking medium. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S ribosomal DNA genes indicated that the strain was closely related to Marinobacterium georgiense. The strain produced dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which was a main metabolite, and small amounts of formate and formaldehyde when grown on DMS as the sole sulfur source. The cells of the strain grown with succinate as a carbon source were able to use methyl mercaptan or methanesulfonate besides DMS but not DMSO or dimethyl sulfone as a sole sulfur source. DMS was transformed to DMSO primarily at wavelengths between 380 and 480 nm by heat-stable photosensitizers released by the strain. DMS was also degraded to formaldehyde in the presence of light by unidentified heat-stable factors released by the strain, and it appeared that strain DMS-S1 used the degradation products, which should be sulfite, sulfate, or methanesulfonate, as sulfur sources.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5527-5532
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume66
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Marinobacterium
dimethyl sulfide
sulfur
sulfide
dimethyl sulfoxide
formaldehyde
Marinobacterium georgiense
heat
formates
sulfites
sulfite
succinic acid
thiols
ribosomal DNA
wavelengths
metabolite
sulfates
seawater
metabolites
sulfate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Biotechnology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Utilization of dimethyl sulfide as a sulfur source with the aid of light by Marinobacterium sp. Strain DMS-S1. / Fuse, Hiroyuki; Takimura, O.; Murakami, K.; Yamaoka, Y.; Omori, T.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 66, No. 12, 2000, p. 5527-5532.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Omori, T.

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