Vascular branching point counts using photoacoustic imaging in the superficial layer of the breast: A potential biomarker for breast cancer

Iku Yamaga, Nobuko Kawaguchi-Sakita, Yasufumi Asao, Yoshiaki Matsumoto, Aya Yoshikawa, Toshifumi Fukui, Masahiro Takada, Masako Kataoka, Masahiro Kawashima, Elham Fakhrejahani, Shotaro Kanao, Yoshie Nakayama, Mariko Tokiwa, Masae Torii, Takayuki Yagi, Takaki Sakurai, Hironori Haga, Kaori Togashi, Tsuyoshi Shiina, Masakazu Toi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to identify the characteristics of the vascular network in the superficial subcutaneous layer of the breast and to analyze differences between breasts with cancer and contralateral unaffected breasts using vessel branching points (VBPs) detected by three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging with a hemispherical detector array. In 22 patients with unilateral breast cancer, the average VBP counts to a depth of 7 mm below the skin surface were significantly greater in breasts with cancer than in the contralateral unaffected breasts (p < 0.01). The ratio of the VBP count in the breasts with cancer to that in the contralateral breasts was significantly increased in patients with a high histologic grade (p = 0.03), those with estrogen receptor-negative disease (p < 0.01), and those with highly proliferative disease (p < 0.01). These preliminary findings indicate that a higher number of VBPs in the superficial subcutaneous layer of the breast might be a biomarker for primary breast cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-13
Number of pages8
JournalPhotoacoustics
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Sep
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Biomarker
  • Breast cancer
  • Photoacoustic imaging
  • Vasculature
  • Vessel branching points

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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